Use v5.20 subroutine signatures

Subroutine signatures, in a rudimentary form, have shown up in Perl v5.20 as an experimental feature. After a few of years of debate and a couple of competing implementations, we have something we can use. And, because it was such a contentious subject, it got the attention a new feature deserves. They don’t have all the features we want (notably type and value constraints), but Perl is in a good position to add those later. » Read more…

Perl v5.18 adds character class set operations

Perl v5.18 added experimental character code set operations, a requirement for full Unicode support according to Unicode Technical Standard #18, which specifies what a compliant language must support and divides those into three levels.

The perlunicode documentation lists each requirement and its status in Perl. Besides some regular expression anchors handling all forms of line boundaries (which might break older programs), set subtraction and intersection in character classes was the last feature Perl needed to be Level 1 compliant. » Read more…

Don’t use named lexical subroutines

Perl v5.18 allows you to define named subroutines that exist only in the current lexical scope. These act (almost) just like the regular named subroutines that you already know about from Learning Perl, but also like the lexical variables that have limited effect. The problem is that the feature is almost irredeemably broken, which you’ll see at the end of this Item. » Read more…

Enforce ASCII semantics when you only want ASCII

When Perl made regexes more Unicode aware, starting in v5.6, some of the character class definitions and match modifiers changed. What you expected to match \d, \s, or \w are more expanvise now (Know your character classes under different semantics). Most of us probably didn’t notice because the range of our inputs is limited. » Read more…

Perl v5.16 now sets proper magic on lexical $_

Perl v5.10 introduced given and the lexical $_. That use of $_, which everyone has assumed is a global variable, turned out to be a huge mistake. The various bookkeeping on the global version didn’t happen with the lexical version, so strange things happened. » Read more…

Use a computed label with loop controllers

Not sure which loop you want to break out of? Perl v5.18 makes that easy with computed labels. The value you give next, last, and redo no longer has to be a literal. You could already do this with goto, but now you can give the loop controllers an expression. » Read more…

Perl v5.20 fixes taint problems with locale

Perl v5.20 fixes taint checking in regular expressions that might use the locale in its pattern, even if that part of the pattern isn’t a successful part of the match. The perlsec documentation has noted that taint-checking did that, but until v5.20, it didn’t.

The only approved way to untaint a variable is through a successful pattern match with captures: » Read more…

Use postfix dereferencing

Perl v5.20 offers an experimental form of dereferencing. Instead of the complicated way I’ll explain in the moment, the new postfix turns a reference into it’s contents. Since this is a new feature, you need to pull it in with the feature pragma (although this feature in undocumented in the pragma docs) (Item 2. Enable new Perl features when you need them. and turn off the experimental warnings: » Read more…

Perl v5.20 combines multiple my() statements

Perl v5.20 continues to clean up and optimize its internals. Now perl optimizes a series of lexical variable declarations into a single list declaration. » Read more…

In v5.20, -F implies -a implies -n

Perl was once known for its one-liners in its sysadmin heydays. People would pass around lists of these one liners, many of which replaced complicated pipelines that glued together various unix utilities to do some impressive system maintenance. » Read more…

7ads6x98y