Category Archives: 5.32

Match Unicode character names with a pattern

Perl has some of the best Unicode support out there, and it keeps getting better. Perl v5.32 supports Unicode 13, and you can now apply patterns to character names. You probably don’t want to do that though. First, the Unicode Character Database catalogs each character, giving it a code number, a name, and many other […]

Turn off indirect object notation

Perl v5.32 adds a way to turn off a Perl feature that you shouldn’t use anyway. You can still use this feature, but now there’s a way to take it away from you. And, with the recent Perl 7 announcement, we see why. Eventually Perl wants to get rid of indirect object notation (and I […]

Chain comparisons to avoid excessive typing

Checking that a value is between two others involves two comparisons, and so far in Perl that’s meant that you’ve had to type one of the values more than once. That gets simpler in v5.32 with chained comparisons. This would make Perl one of the few languages that support the feature. So far its implemented […]

Perl v5.32 New Features

Perl v5.32 is out and it has some interesting new features. The previous major releases focussed more on finally removing deprecations and shoring up odd cases, and you still find a few of those in this release. Full details, as always, are in the perldelta. Sawyer X just announced Perl 7 as a major version […]

Use the infix class instance operator

Perl v5.32 adds Paul Evans’s infix isa operator—the “class instance operator”. One of the delightful things to note about this is addition is that it is one of the features whose development took place almost entirely through a GitHub issue and pull request. GitHub is now the primary repository for the Perl code, and has […]

Match only the same Unicode script

Earlier this year, this website was the target of some sort of attack in which a bot sent seemingly random data in its requests. The attack wasn’t that big of a deal since I easily blocked it with Cloudflare, but it was interesting. The apparently random data was actually a mix of Latin, Hangul, and […]